All Posts Filed in ‘art

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EAR MISS

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Must hand it to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Diffusing the gravitas and reverence of the great Vincent’s public image is no easy feat. But they’ve cleverly managed it with the subtle humor of this ad campaign for the museum cafe–which features a still life image that’s, well, almost perfect.

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DAMAGE CONTROL

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Any artistic practice that calls itself Snarkitecture can’t be expected to have a wholesome worldview, and the Brooklyn-based team behind the name is particularly drawn to imperfections. Broken Ornament, made from gypsum cement, may raise a few eyebrows around the Christmas tree, but there’s no denying its wabi-sabi allure.

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MIXED MEDIA

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Neon is not, whatever else it may be, a nuanced medium. But Todd Sanders, a Texas-based neon artist, employes weathering techniques and recycled materials to create signs like this fleur de lis–made for a project to benefit New Orleans’ rebuilding efforts–in which neon is a key player, but not the only one.

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AMERICAN0

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At Germany’s Vitra Design Museum, the current exhibition entitled Pop Art Design brings together some of the most familiar images of that art movement, along with some less familiar objects–like this Leonardo sofa, designed in 1969 by Francesco Audrito and Athena Sampaniotou of the Italian architectural firm Studio 65.

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BEAUTY AND GRAINS

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The recent defacing of a seminal work by the great Mark Rothko at Britain’s Tate Modern Gallery incited international outrage, but the Brooklyn artists Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin put their displeasure to creative use.

Taking their cue from the marred painting’s provenance as part of a failed triptych commission for New York’s The Four Seasons restaurant, Hargreaves and Levin have impressively interpreted these works in edible matter–grains of rice–and, to boot, injected a bit of levity by entitling the series Mark Rice-Ko.