All Posts Filed in ‘graphic design

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FRUITFUL LOOPS: LINE DRAWINGS BY PIERRE CHARPIN

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dezeen_Wrong-Shop-Editions-at-twentytwentyone-7Even accomplished furniture and product designers need to express themselves more informally. French designer Pierre Charpin, whose portfolio includes furniture for Ligne Roset and tableware for Alessi, finds expression in repetitive lines. His Loop drawings, originally executed in felt tip pens, have been converted to a suite of four digital prints, each now available for purchase in a limited edition of 50. “I attach great importance to this practice,” says Charpin of the act of drawing,  “because it is the link to my visual arts background.” An awfully pretty link, I’d say.dezeen_Wrong-Shop-Editions-at-twentytwentyone-6dezeen_Wrong-Shop-Editions-at-twentytwentyone-5dezeen_Wrong-Shop-Editions-at-twentytwentyone-8

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ROMANCING THE RAIN

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niemann-cover-690x962“When I arrived in New York for the first time, it was pouring. Maybe that’s why, to my mind, there’s no place on earth where being stuck in traffic on a rainy day is more beautiful.” Clearly, there’s no end to the ways in which New York City can work its magic. German illustrator Christoph Niemann manages to make being stuck in traffic in New York City in the rain look like an exquisitely melancholy experience–thanks to a brilliant interactive cover for this week’s New Yorker that may succeed in making City dwellers long for a rainy day.

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DETROIT STATE OF MIND

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detroit-cover-500pxDetroit is making a comeback; sort of. The beaten and battered midwestern city has fallen on hard times, to be sure, but tales about ‘urban pioneers’ moving into decrepit houses bought for a few thousand dollars; artfully filtered photos of crumbling, once-stately edifices; documentary films about those who’ve stayed put against all odds; and Shinola, a made-in-Detroit brand of luxury trinkets, are imbuing Detroit with the glow of an abandoned city, slowly rising from the ashes. Whether there’s anything substantive to that portrait is a matter of debate, but, Wildsom Field Guides, that travel book series “with a bygone sense of place,” is piping in with its Detroit field guide, which details, among other things, the city’s resilient natives and neighborhood shops, “like Lonzo Jackson’s barber shop and Signal Return’s print studio….Maggie Townsend, who drives a city bus, and Naomi Long Madgett, a poet ninety years young…” Detroit-bound or not,  which romantic could pass up a tale of hardscrabble American living?wildsamefieldnotes_interviews_2000x1150wildsamefieldnotes_leather_journal_group_2000x1150_1

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TOOL MARK

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Ah, there’s something about a beautifully illustrated logo–which this self-initiated mark from the Manchester (UK)-based design agency United Creatives most certainly is.

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PUCCI UNCOVERED

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Harper’s Bazaar magazine has issued 3 delicious limited-edition covers for their April issue, all featuring colorful patterns from fashion house Emilio Pucci. A project spawned by a partnership with the Victoria & Albert Museum, and in honor of the V&A’s current exhibition, The Glamour of Italian Fashion, the covers showcase previously unpublished original drawings from Pucci’s ’60s and ’70s archives–and are only available for sale at the V&A museum shop.

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EGG NOD

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New York’s Javas Lehn Studio made its own clever contemporary art statement as part of an ad campaign for Hotel Americano’s Chelsea branch, located in the heart of the city’s gallery district. Minimalism, served sunny side up? Why ever not?

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SINGING THE BLUE

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The yet-to-be-published cover of this Sunday’s New York Times Magazine, which tells the story of forgotten 1930’s female blues singers Geeshie Wiley and Elvie Thomas.  Talk about perfect pitch.