All Posts Filed in ‘photography

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DARK MATTER

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It’s not every day that a 62 year-old female director makes the cover of Time magazine, and rarer still for a memorable piece of copy to find its way there. But this week’s Time goes arty and literary (though I really, really wish they had let that excellent headline stand alone).

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EAR MISS

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Must hand it to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Diffusing the gravitas and reverence of the great Vincent’s public image is no easy feat. But they’ve cleverly managed it with the subtle humor of this ad campaign for the museum cafe–which features a still life image that’s, well, almost perfect.

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GETTING CLEAN

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In one of the most peculiar brand loyalty stories ever told, New York Magazine reports that Tide laundry detergent–no lie–has become valuable currency in street drug transactions.  It sells “for either $5 cash or $10 worth of weed or crack cocaine.”

 

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PEARED DOWN

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Album cover art rarely comes this spare, and, even more rarely, features still life photography. But Dwight Yoakam’s oddly-titled recent release, Three Pears, features a cover that manages to be at once literal and poetic.

 

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BALLOON MAN

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There are 10 photographic prints in Scott King’s A Balloon for Britain series, but I’d be perfectly happy with just one.

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BEYOND THE PALE

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Oh, to have the knockout poetic eye of Swedish photographer Hannah Lemholt. And one of these color-free, ravishing still life compositions would be nice, too.

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GREAT ESCAPE

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“There’s something nice about having a get-me-the-hell-out-of-here key.” No argument here. The keyboard ESC option was invented, it turns out, in 1960 by IBM programmer Bob Bemer, and we’ve been using it to escape ever since.