Monthly Archives of: December 2009

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THEN & NOW

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Words have power because of what they mean, of course, but also because of how they look.  Painters have used words for visual effect since George Braque stenciled the word BAL or BACH (we can’t be sure which came first) onto the surface of two cubist oil paintings in the autumn of 1911, forevermore framing the argument for what constitutes high versus low, or refined art versus commercial fare.

Braque could scarcely have imagined the work of Ed Ruscha, who was both a graphic designer and a painter, and didn’t bother himself much with labels.  For Ruscha, words and the picture plane are nothing without each other. To love the turn of a phrase, to love the painted surface, and to love both the subversive and visual power of language is to find it impossible to turn away from a work like NOW, one of my all-time favorite Ruscha compositions.  I tried looking away when I first saw it in person years ago. Couldn’t do it then; can’t do it now.

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EX-MAS

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Too late for Christmas past, perhaps, but definitely an object of desire for 2010, Austrian designer, Matthias Lehr’s X-Mas-Tree-Stand might actually induce me to get a live tree again.  Made of wood from Black Forest fir trees and stainless steel tubing, it neatly folds for storage, too boot.

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RE-SAIL

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Mark Weaver’s visual reinterpretation of Moby Dick, in poster form.

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STAR GAZING

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Vignettes from a silent night at home.

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ALL THE RAGE

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Let Fury Have the Hour is a feature length documentary about the influential English punk-rock group The Clash, and its founder and guitarist, the late Joe Strummer.  Shepard Fairey’s fine poster for the film will, no doubt, become a most-wanted piece of movie collateral.

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SUNDOWN

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The Danish designer, Guus Oosterbaan’s memorial to the fading glow of the incandescent lightbulb–the bulbs are to be outlawed in Denmark in 2010–is humorous, sweet and just a wee bit sad.

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CLASSICAL MUSIC

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A stunningly beautiful iron triangle from early 19th Century Germany, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s permanent collection.